Friday Sketchbook: All the King’s Horses

Every morning the Royal steeds get a workout in the huge riding ring behind the castle, practicing their teamwork skills, keeping in shape for ceremonial coach-drawing, if that's a word. Come to think of it, it's a great place to sketch. T
Every morning the Royal steeds get a good workout in the huge riding ring behind Christiansborg Palace in Central Copenhagen, practicing their coach-drawing skills, staying in shape for Royal events requiring equestrian services. Come to think of it, it’s a good place to practice my coach-drawing skills, too. According to a sign at the entrance to the Royal Stables, these beautiful white horses are Kladrubers, a breed from the Czech Republic. They are born dark gray and age gradually into their white coats. Some still have some gray dappling. Pencil and watercolor wash on Stillman & Birn Alpha Series Sketchbook.
Speaking of coach-drawing, here's the Royal Coach, all fitted out in gold, with The interior has plush tufted pearl gray seating. Underneath is an elaborate spring suspension system. The big painted wheels are rubber coated. Everything is built for luxurious comfort, but it can’t possibly cushion the blow of a cobblestone pavement.
Speaking of coach-drawing, here’s the Royal Coach, all fitted out in gold, with plush tufted pearl gray interior and an elaborate suspension system beneath. The big wheels are rubber coated-but they can’t possibly cushion the ride entirely over Copenhagen’s cobblestone pavement. I imagine the Royal Family likes to keep these trips short. Maybe just lunch and a little shopping. Pencil on Moleskine 5 x 8 Sketchbook.
The Marble Bridge, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, where the King's coaches have rolled into town since 1744.
The Marble Bridge from Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, across which the King’s coaches have rolled to town since 1744. Watercolor wash over pencil, 8 1/2 x 11 Stillman & Birn Alpha Series Sketchbook.
A team of two white horses draws the little rig and driver. I don't know what the official name for the vehicle is. A buggy? A mini-coach? cabriolet? sulky? practice- phaeton?
A team of two white horses draws the little rig and driver. I don’t know what the official name for the vehicle is. Buggy? Mini-coach? Cabriolet? Practice-Phaeton? Whatever it was, it was lovely to watch them work. Pencil on Stillman & Birn Alpha Series sketchbook.
The actual Danish Royal Stables, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen. At their height, they housed 270 horses. Today they hold about 20. But walking in here, the first thing that hits you is a strong feeling of well-being and the sweet scent of hay and horses. Nothing else like it.
The Danish Royal Stables at Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen. It once housed 270 horses, back in the day before cars (and bicycles, probably) had been invented; today they hold about 20 horses. The first thing that hits you when you step inside is a feeling of great well-being, along with the scent of hay and very well-cared-for horses.

Any day that begins with horses is a good day in my book.

Happy Friday.

 

 

4 thoughts on “Friday Sketchbook: All the King’s Horses

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